Monday, September 26, 2016

Role of the Information Professional in the Development and Promotion of Digital Humanities case study by Jane Burns

Jane Burns (RCSI and UCD) shares her knowledge and experience of digital humanities and examines awareness of this new and emerging field in Irish libraries.

In this case study, relevant findings from research that sought to determine the level of awareness of digital humanities in Irish Libraries is examined. The research project, The Mary Martin Diary, is highlighted as an example of a multidisciplinary collaboration project that utilized library communication skills, project management skills, digital humanities tools and techniques, as well as other online resources in its development. These skills and tools have the potential to be applied to similar projects that librarians engage in. Recommendations derived from this research highlight the practical application of skills for information professionals and their roles in the development and promotion of digital humanities content for research, teaching, and learning in the modern academic library (abstract by Jane Burns
Jane’s insightful article is published in  New Review of Academic Librarianship and she will talk on this topic at the seminar Academic Librarians Communicating in the 21st Century: Perspectives from the New Review of Academic Librarianship at Maynooth University Library on the 20th October 2016. While the seminar is free booking is essential.




Communicating new library roles to enable digital scholarship - research article by John Cox

John Cox, Librarian at NUI Galway has written an in in depth review article on new and emerging roles in the area of digital scholarship.  He identifies and analyses the key literature on the topic and this will be of enormous benefit to academic libraries engaging with this new and emerging field.

Academic libraries enable a wide range of digital scholarship activities, increasingly as a partner rather than as a service provider. Communicating that shift in role is challenging, not least as digital scholarship is a new field with many players whose activities on campus can be disjointed. The library's actual and potential contributions need to be broadcast to a diverse range of internal and external constituencies, primarily academic staff, university management, library colleagues and related project teams, often with different perspectives. Libraries have significant contributions to offer and a focused communications strategy is needed to embed libraries in digital scholarship and to create new perceptions of their role as enabling partners. (abstract by John Cox)


John’s in depth review article is published in New Review of Academic Librarianship and he will talk on this topic at the seminar Academic Librarians Communicating in the 21st Century: Perspectives from the New Review of Academic Librarianship at Maynooth University Library on the 20th October 2016. While the seminar is free booking is essential.